Protein imprinted materials designed with charged binding sites on screen-printed electrode for microseminoprotein-beta determination in biological samples

Tânia S C R Rebelo, Carlos M. Pereira, M. Goreti F Sales, João Paulo da Costa de Noronha, Fernando Silva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the past few years a large effort is being made aiming at the development of fast and reliable tests for cancer biomarkers. Protein imprinted sensors can be a fast and reliable strategy to develop tailor made sensors for a large number of relevant molecules. This work aims to produce, optimize and use in biological samples a biosensor for microseminoprotein-beta (MSMB). Caffeic acid (CAF) electropolimerization was performed in the presence of microseminoprotein-beta (MSMB) creating target protein specific cavities on the surface of a screen-printed carbon. Dopamine was introduced as charged monomer labelling the binding site and was allowed to self-organize around the protein. The subsequent electropolimerization was made by applying a constant potential of +2.0 V, for 30 s, on a carbon screen-printed electrode, immersed in a solution of protein and CAF prepared in phosphate buffer. The sensor with charged monomers showed a more sensitive response, with an average slope of -7.59 μA/decade, linear concentration range of 0.5-100 ng/mL and a detection limit of 0.12 ng/mL. The corresponding non-imprinted sensor displayed an inconsistent response over the range of the calibration curve. The biosensor was successfully applied to the analysis of MSMB in serum and urine samples.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)846-852
JournalSensors And Actuators B-Chemical
Volume223
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2016

Keywords

  • Caffeic acid
  • Electrochemical biosensor
  • Microseminoprotein-beta
  • Protein imprinted materials
  • Screen-printed electrodes
  • Serum
  • Urine

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